Monday, March 27, 2017

World's First Head Transplant Recipient Wants A Better Life

Valery Spiridonov talks about why he wants to be the first ever recipient of the highly-controversial head transplant.

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Saturday, March 25, 2017

Pieces of 'Atlantis': 16th century Dominican church revealed in drought (Drone footage)


A severe drought in Mexico has revealed a 400-year-old Dominican church that has remained almost completely intact despite spending decades submerged under water. Drone footage of the submerged church sitting in the Benito Juarez Dam in Jalapa del Marquez, Oaxaca, was captured on Monday.


The Rainbow Mountains of Ausangate, PERU

Southern Peru’s Cordillera Vilcanota is not only home to some of the most varied and magnificent landscapes in the Andes but also to the Sacred Mountain of Ausangate (6372m), revered by many as the mountain spirit on which life depends. Staying in the comfort of mountain eco-lodges, this spectacular trek reaches isolated shepherding communities, high altitude lakes and peaceful meadows where wild alpacas graze. High passes lead the way to the foot of Ausangate's glacier, a sight to behold. There’s time still to discover the Inca fortresses of the Sacred Valley and to visit the majestic Inca citadel of Machu Picchu.


Watch These Cave Divers’ Epic Climb to Dark Star

Just reaching one of Dark Star’s seven known entrances is tough. The monstrous remote cave in Uzbekistan, one of the world’s deepest high-altitude cave systems, can’t be attained without rock-climbing skills and equipment.

An expedition team included an ensemble of world-class cavers and scientists ages 22 to 54, with Russians, Italians, Israelis, one German, and National Geographic writer Mark Synott. After meeting up with the team in Tashkent, the capital of Uzbekistan, his journey was far from over.

From there they traveled together a little over a hundred miles by bus, with hundreds of pounds of food and gear for three weeks in the field, across the arid plains. They took a popular tourist route that follows the ancient Silk Road to Samarqand. Then they turned off the beaten path, heading south toward the Afghan border to Boysun, where they loaded everything into a six-wheeled Soviet-era troop transport. As they lumbered into the Boysuntov (also known as Baysun-Tau) Range, the mountains gradually rose to 12,000 feet and then dropped off in a jagged line of spectacular cliffs. Once the route became too steep for the truck, the team hiked for two days with 15 donkeys to haul their supplies up to the base camp, perched on sloping terraces at the foot of the limestone escarpment. It took several days of rigging ropes to access the cave and haul up gear. In the article Synott remembers, "But finally I hoisted myself up a 450-foot rope to the cave’s main entrance (dubbed Izhevskaya, or R21). I began to see why cavers think of Dark Star as a living, breathing entity. Down at base camp, the temperature hovered around 100°F, but up here I was shocked to find myself bracing against a freezing wind blasting out of Dark Star’s mouth."


Inventing Graphics on Cave Walls | Origins: The Journey of Humankind

Deep inside the caves of El Castillo and La Pasiega, our early ancestors were experimenting with a language we take for granted today: graphic communication.

About Origins: The Journey of Humankind:
Hosted by Jason Silva, Origins: The Journey of Humankind rewinds all the way back to the beginning and traces the innovations that made us modern.



Thursday, March 23, 2017

Turtle Recovers From Surgery After Eating Coins

A sea turtle in Thailand underwent hours of surgery after she was found to have been attempting to digest nearly a thousand coins flipped into her pool by tourists hoping for good luck.
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This is EPIC, Just the one swan, actually...

According to this bloke: During his morning commute home from Kingston Station, a lone swan decided it had other plans for his schedule.

Despite attempts to shoo it away, the bugger was receiving statutory protection from the Queen herself and took full advantage of this fact. 45 minutes of strutting, screaming and smirking later, the trains finally started moving again!

You had to admit, the swan was a plucky one :P


Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Drones used in fight against plastic pollution on UK beaches

A new initiative is combining drones, tidal studies and navigation technology to try and work out where the millions of tonnes of plastic we dump in the sea ends up.

The Plastic Tides project is mapping the journeys taken by rubbish such as plastic bottles before they wash up on our beaches.

Sky's Technology Correspondent Tom Cheshire reports.



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